Monday, January 31, 2011

Carmen Herrera

Hard-edged geometric abstraction has never been my thing but this is an amazing artist and an amazing story about Cuban artist Carmen Herrera who was "discovered" at age 89.

Interview with Carmen Herrera at The Guardian















Monday, January 17, 2011

Lee Newman

Small drypoints by friend and grad school colleague, Washington painter/printmaker Lee Newman. Lee shows at the Washington Printmakers Gallery.




 "Alzheimers Head 4"





 "Homeless"





 "Leaning Back, State II"







 "Alzheimers Head 1"

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Creative Types: Embrace Chaos | Malcolm Gladwell | Big Think

Creative Types: Embrace Chaos | Malcolm Gladwell | Big Think

Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer with The New Yorker magazine since 1996. His 1999 profile of Ron Popeil won a National Magazine Award, and in 2005 he was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People. He is the author of four books, including "The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference," (2000) , "Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking" (2005), and "Outliers: The Story of Success" (2008) all of which were number one New York Times bestsellers. His latest book, "What the Dog Saw" (2009) is a compilation of stories published in The New Yorker.
From 1987 to 1996, he was a reporter with the Washington Post, where he covered business, science, and then served as the newspaper's New York City bureau chief. He graduated from the University of Toronto, Trinity College, with a degree in history. He was born in England, grew up in rural Ontario, and now lives in New York City.

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Winter Work

A few slices of recent (2010) landscape paintings of Ohio from the Spring, late Autumn and early Winter. All the works are oils, small in scale (approximately 12" x 15," on panels, or rag paper.

































































Friday, January 7, 2011

Rafael Alberti


 To the Retina

To you, rounded garden, where beauty, like
an open window's view, lies clearly drawn;
curved flower iridescing in the eye
from band's-end blackness to the blond of dawn.

To you, mirror in whom the infinity
of Nature's images is held like treasure:
occluded sun, night of sublimity;
open moon, sunlit hour without measure.

To you, animated even during sleep,
chivalric in the oath to life you keep,
mullioned window on the sea of fortune.

Without you, what would be the color's plight,
painter of the painters, child of light?
To you, always Painting's source & origin.


From To Painting: Poems by Rafael Alberti, trans. by Carolyn Tipton

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Cortona Palcoscenico

I spent the summer of 2010 in Cortona, Italy.  This time I decided to take a break from the landscape paintings I've been doing for almost 30 years and concentrate instead on the people in the streets, particularly the action in the two main piazze of Cortona - Piazza Repubblica and Piazza Signorelli. The entrance and departure of people, mostly tourists, but also local cittadini, in the open, public space of the piazza called to mind a stage, where small human dramas were enacted. Hence the title of the group of 21 paintings, Cortona Palcoscenico.

The paintings were done with acrylics on some very nice, small (8" x 10") linen covered panels I found in Arezzo.  I'm usually not overly fond of the plastic feeling or look of acrylics, but occasionally I'm seduced by the games you can play with them because of their fast-drying nature. If a color will be dry in five minutes why not put down, as a kind of wild card, some strange and provocative color to start with and then work with it, instead of going straight for the color of the subject as I see it. Why not build to it gradually through the negotiations of layers and overlaps of transparent or opaque paint?

The complete series can be viewed by clicking the slideshow link to the right.

























My New Website

I used to say I was the last artist alive without a website. As of 2011, that's no longer true. Please check it out and let me know what you think. Click on the title above this post, or paste the URL in your browser:

http://frank-hobbsart.com

I will be adding more to the site over the next few weeks.